No, the tweets below, from the state-owned CBC’s “News” account, are not part of an effort to reignite the far-left’s shitty (literally) “Occupy” movement. It just looks like it. And they definitely aren’t part of a campaign to promote Justin Trudeau and his Liberal-left progressives, even though the themes are exactly the same. And they’re also not just a helpful nod to the socialist NDP’s campaign to divide Canadians into classes and sectors and get them to hate each other. No the real answer is that it’s all those things at the same time.

Yeah we are the 1%, says Amanda Lang and the CBC, complete with a photo of her beside a sign saying so. We can’t say it enough!

They tweeted this promo over and over. I counted nine times that this was tweeted on @CBCNews, just one of the state-owned CBC’s many Twitter accounts. Since March 14 the account has tweeted about the protests against the militant, murderous socialist regime in Venezuela, once.

That state-owned media would organize such a politically-charged “event” is a farce, since  the outcome is preordained by the CBC’s systemic left-wing bias and left-wing audience. But like so much of the “Occupy” idiocy, or Justin Trudeau’s/Tom Mulcair’s progressive-left blather, or the obsequious left-wing advocacy from their CBC division, the premise is mostly a farce.

The former chief economic analyst at Stats Can, Philip Cross, was quoted in a recent article speaking in direct contradiction to the CBC (et al) and their false narrative and leftist agenda:

“I would say that [the real statistical evidence] contradicts the idea that all the wealth in the last decade was hoarded by the 1% and the rest of us are fighting over table scraps.”

Here’s more from the article that was published at the Financial Post:

Financial_Post
The ‘paycheque to paycheque’ myth: How Canada’s middle class is getting richer, a lot richer

Canadian politicians have been trying to make the middle class out to be a poor huddled mass of declining fortunes, but a landmark study from Statistics Canada paints very much the opposite picture.

The study, released Tuesday, shows the median net worth of Canadian families jumped 44.5% to $243,800 in 2012, up from $168,700 in 2005. Over the past 15 years, the median net worth figure leaps 80%. The numbers are adjusted for inflation and measure the amount of money left over if all debts were paid and all assets were sold.

“This shows the middle class isn’t withering away,” said Philip Cross, research fellow for the Macdonald-Laurier Institute and former chief economic analyst at Statistics Canada. “It shows Canadians have money to set aside for savings, so it’s not like they are living from paycheque to paycheque, which is the way a lot of the narrative surrounding the middle class has recently been framed.”

… Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau said in an ad last year that the current Canadian economy tends to overwhelmingly benefit “a few” at the expense of Canada’s middle class.

This idea was not borne out in the StatsCan study which also showed the middle class sucking up a bigger portion of the country’s overall wealth. …

The big CBC Q&A about “the 1%” and “income inequality” comes at the same time the Liberals and the even more socialist NDP are advancing exactly those themes as the central part of their election campaign platforms. For example, see “Kelly McParland: Trudeau and Mulcair need to convince middle class Canadians their life sucks.” So the CBC joins them, as do several other left-wing and far-left organizations that are advancing exactly the same themes at the same time. I’ll be called a whack-job conspiracy-theorist for saying that they are seemingly acting in concert; even while they are actually working, uh, amazingly together on the same theme at the same time; and even though they’re flying in the face of the statistical science which proves them wrong about their whole premise, and bastardizes their political platform.

In her pallid answers, even the CBC’s Amanda Lang says that this isn’t actually about the 1% that she and her CBC tweeted about more than a dozen times.  It’s about the top 1/10 of the 1%. Yup. That many people.

The real problem is at the very top end of the 1% – the 1/10th of 1%, or the uber rich.
— Amanda Lang “answers your questions…”

What is that  —  like eight people in Canada? As we say in my house, holy crap that’s a small number with which to invent a false crisis especially when it’s based on pure crap politics and idiocy, and now let’s change channels from CBC back to Fox News please.

cbc-square logoThe other answers that Amanda Lang featured, by the way, were mostly fluff and bromides designed to appeal to the typical “Occupy” left-wing whiner. In other words, their base audience, and the Liberal/NDP voter base.

The “1%” (ore more accurately, the 1/10 of 1%) I worry about are not the people who made it in this world. It’s those people who have the controls of a state-owned 1.5 billion-dollar per-year multi-platform media behemoth, and use it like a tool to advance a political agenda, at our own expense, not their own.  Like they did here.  They are much, much more powerful. And they didn’t earn it. And it’s not even their money, or their tools. The CBC is what should be “occupied.”

 

State-owned media should be banned in Canada, and that notion enshrined in our constitution.

Joel Johannesen
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