Globe and Mail Saturday: Bash Harper; and then the news.

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The Article

image Today’s GlobeandMail.com front page features a nice top-left grouping of articles all seemingly there to altruistically aid you good Canadians into understanding the “crisis” that the Harper administration has wrought on you good Canadians and your erstwhile fantastic country. 

It’s very telling. 

• Under the first article (the ominous sounding “The broken chain of answerability”), a relatively huge photo of Conservative Prime Minister Stephen Harper is displayed, purposely leaving the unmistakable impression that it is all abut him and his lack of answers to urgent questions to which inquiring minds urgently need answers.  But in actual fact, the story isn’t about the current Prime Minister per se, at all.  It’s a general article about the way government works.  Why the photo of Harper?  Abject anti-Harper bias and an effort to mislead.  That’s why. In my humble but spot-on opinion. 

The online article accepts reader comments—and I swear to God I didn’t read this one until after I wrote this blog entry almost in its entirety—one reader wrote:

“Here I was expecting a Harper-hateful smearfest! As it turns out, the article is balanced and almost sympathetic to the plight faced by PM’s who actually want to get things done.

The headline and pic make it seem like a slag-Harper thing, however. That’s probably good enough for the haters.”

As usual, it’s that kind of wisdom from the roots which I could never phrase better.

• The second article, tendentiously employing the robustly negative title “No, Prime Minister” (which has about as much intellectual breadth as “Yes we can!” only in reverse), is a long, boring, and rather snooty diatribe written by the seemingly anti-conservative Globe and Mail reporter Gloria Galloway.  It’s about how Stephen Harper isn’t getting along with all those liberals appointed to the liberals’ myriad bureaucracies by Liberals and leftists over the decades.  Shocka. 

Naturally, like all liberal media, Galloway relies (shall we say to a “high degree”?) on those whom you will hopefully envisage as elite university professors, to academically bolster her article and, well, thesis.  Many in the liberal media do this because as I’ve reminded you before, university professors are reliably anti-conservative, left-wing, and sometimes outright Marxist in their world view; and also because the liberal media feel as though university professors lend some sort of awesome academic “credibility” to their stories amongst their key demographic, the pop-culture stupidaratzi in Canada. 

… “Even so, when it comes to Elections Canada, “it’s significant the Conservative Party is so hostile to that institution,” says Stephen Clarkson, a political economist at the University of Toronto and a biographer of Pierre Trudeau.” …
—Galloway’s article

Ironically, Galloway cast the fact that Stephen Harper is at odds with some institutional bureaucrats… as a bad thing!  The liberals’ media does this all the time, and each time, it makes me laugh.  She even created a long list of bureaucrats who were fired, when they were fired, and of course why-by-insinuation.  We in the sensible set actually see all this (Harper standing up to those big government bureaucrats) as a very good thing, and it’s one of the reasons Stephen Harper is among the most popular party leaders in years. She of course doesn’t mention his popularity in her article. 

I’ve previously said that Harper and his successors should appoint only stalwart conservatives to all bureaucracies and the Supreme Court for the next 20 or more years, simply to regain a semblance of balance in this country, which is currently run from top to bottom by liberal-leftists appointed by liberal-leftists over the decades.  I figure Galloway would write up a big academic article on “treason” if that came to pass. 

• The third article, “Live, Tuesday: The crisis of Canadian government” (I highlighted the word “crisis” for you in case you weren’t already jumping off the cliff over the current “crisis” in Canada!), isn’t an article at all.  It’s simply a repeat of the first article, only highlighting the fact that the author of the first article will be online Tuesday from 1-2 p.m. ET to answer questions.  But the piling on effect in listing it as if it’s yet another take on the big old “crisis”, is unmistakable.  And misleading. 

Maybe next week the Globe and Mail will do a feature on the deleterious effect of decades of secular-progressive liberal-leftism in this country, or perhaps the abject failure of the liberal-left’s ideologically-driven North Korean-style healthcare system in Canada which has led to countless deaths and untold suffering.  I.e., actual crises.

As if.

 

Joel Johannesen
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